water quality

A reckless law on NC regulations

Published: August 28, 2013 No one supports pointless regulations. If regulations exist, there should be a good reason for them, a reason that applies not only to the time of their adoption, but to present circumstances. Regulations that require unnecessary protections or no longer apply do not serve the common good and can become impediments to commerce. This is the sensible premise on which House Bill 74 signed into law last week by Gov. Pat McCrory purports to rest. Its title says as much: “An act to improve and streamline the regulatory process in order to stimulate job creation [and] to eliminate unnecessary regulation.” On signing the bill, the governor repeated the sentiment, saying, “This common sense legislation cuts government red tape, axes overly burdensome regulations and puts job creation first here in North Carolina.” Sounds logical and harmless. Except the bill is not what its title and the governor claim it is. It is illogical and dangerous. It is concessions to developers and polluters crammed into a massive bill that was rushed through the legislature in the crush of closing business.
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Senate Bills Meet Crossover Deadline

 

By: Jack Tarpey

On Wednesday, the NC Senate passed two bills marking serious rollbacks for environmental protections in North Carolina. With the crossover deadline rapidly approaching, the passage of these bills in the Senate means they will be eligible to be heard in the House at any time for the rest of this session.

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Crossover Week: Jordan Lake, Terminal Groins, and more!

It’s a busy week at the General Assembly as the crossover deadline approaches this Thursday. As legislators try to push their bills through by the deadline, there are a number of bills that will have a huge impact on our air, water, and natural places. A bill that would roll back the Jordan Lake Rules, S515, will come up in the Senate on Wednesday or Thursday. The bill is a move in the wrong direction for the conservation of Lake Jordan. Cleanup efforts at the lake have already been delayed after legislative battles in 2010 and 2012, and the passage of this bill would only further delay efforts. Additionally, this bill seeks to focus on the treatment of pollution, rather than controlling the sources of pollution. This isn’t just a delay tactic that kicks the can down the road, but it completely repeals the Jordan Lake Rules and puts nothing in its place other than a legislative study. It could take years to develop a new set of rules, while current efforts to clean up the lake are halted.
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